Energy saving solutions

Project designed by ZeroEnergy Design; Photo: Eric Roth

Build efficiency and comfort into your home

Are you renovating or adding on to your home sweet home, or building your dream home? Make energy efficiency a part of your project from the start.

An energy efficient home looks no different than a “regular” home. The interior and exterior can be designed to your liking. Any style of home can be energy efficient—it’s all about “building in” the energy details!

Did You Know?

  • Through extensive research and testing, building scientists have found that the best strategy for maximizing your health and comfort at home is to “build tight and ventilate right.” With a simple ventilation system, your home can have a continuous, controlled supply of fresh air.
  • Make sure to seal and insulate the area around your window frames to prevent drafts and improve your comfort.
  • The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates Massachusetts homeowners can save an average of 18% on heating and cooling costs by air sealing their homes and adding insulation.
  • Insulation should be properly installed by an expert to ensure performance to its rated insulating value.

Benefits of Energy Efficient Homes

  • A lifetime of energy savings (which translates into additional money you can save or spend however you wish)
  • Consistent comfort in each room of your home
  • A healthier living environment with excellent indoor air quality
  • Increased home value
  • Reduced air pollution, helping the environment and our community

The key to designing and building an energy efficient home is to look at your home “as a system.” How do all the components interact? Consider your home’s heating, cooling, and water heating equipment as well as insulation, lighting, and appliances. These are interdependent parts that influence the performance of your home as an energy system.

Please visit ngrid.com/save to learn more.

The article “Energy saving solutions build efficiency and comfort into your home” is a collaboration between the Boston Society of Architects/AIA and National Grid.